digbicks:

What I Be Project, Steve Rosenfield

Photographer Steve Rosenfield recently asked subjects far and wide to complete the following statement: "I am not my ___ ". He prompted individuals to fill in the blank with their deepest and darkest insecurities, moving people to bring issues regarding body image, substance abuse, mental illness, race and sexuality to the forefront. The results of the social experiment of sorts is a photography series titled the What I Be Project, an intimate examination of the anxieties and inhibitions that plague men and women of all ages. 

The “What I Be Project” is all about honesty.

In today’s society, we are told to look or act a certain way. If we differ from these “standards,” we are often judged, ridiculed, and sometimes even killed over them.

By stating “I am not my_____,” people are claiming that they do in fact struggle with these issues, but it does not define who they are as a person. It is not aimed for people to say “You’re not fat,” or “You don’t have love handles.” It is to spread awareness on what people go through due to society’s paved roads. These are serious issues that some of us can live with, but most battle on a day to day basis. 

  1. I am not my shame.
  2. I am not my gender.
  3. I am not my image.
  4. I am not my turban.
  5. I am not my weakness.
  6. I am my amputation.
  7. I am not my bi-polar disorder.
  8. I am not my adoption.
  9. I am not my number.
  10. I am not my vision.

(Source: stevejrosenfield.com, via amoebagrrrl)

saucymerbabe:

lovethyfatness:

[Series of texts by @fatnutritionist, which read: “People are mad at me because they ‘work so hard’ to be fit or lose weight. They have told me this explicitly. It implies that they think my rejecting the values they subscribe to can somehow take away the fitness they’ve worked for. That is totally delusional. If you’ve worked hard for fitness, no amount of fat people rejecting stigma can take that away. So this is obviously not actually about fitness, at all. It’s about the other thing they ‘worked hard’ for: social status. They DO think, and they know, that the social status they have worked hard to earn, through ‘fitness,’ can be devalued. It can be devalued if the hierarchy that rewards them is crushed. Crushed by people rejecting stigma. We can’t take away your fitness or whatever weight you’ve lost. But we can devalue those things by destroying fat stigma. So they are afraid of us, and for good reason. If fat people aren’t stigmatized, then there is no more thin privilege. Remember always, fat people: People are afraid of you because you have an awesome power - to destroy the hierarchy. If they were not afraid of losing their place in the hierarchy, they would not come after you so viciously.” All tweets were accompanied by the hashtag, #notyourgoodfatty]

Read the full thread of Michelle’s tweets on Storify.

SO MUCH TRUTH.

(via cocksucking-accent)

stablevertigo:

What I mean when I say “I can’t do that”- Anxiety Version:

  • I am unable to do that
  • I am too stressed out to do that
  • I cannot face the humiliation of attempting to do that
  • My body will physically not allow me to do that
  • I am on the verge of a panic attack
  • I cannot do that

What people hear:

  • I am unwilling to do that
  • I am just shy
  • I am overreacting
  • I am lazy
  • I need to get more experience in social situation to help my anxiety
  • I need a push
  • I don’t want to do that

Inspired by X

(via hobbitkaiju)

cutemetalhead:

by the way, since we’re talking about r/tumblrinaction, i just thought you should all know that they literally encourage their users to go through these tags to pick on people, so i’d be wary about tagging stuff so it appears in these tags.
as was stated before, a lot of redditors use an entry youre featured on to send you anon hate, reblog your post to unsafe people, etc. so they might find you through these tags. a good way to avoid this is to put letters/numbers/symbols after the trigger, so you could put say #ableism 890283948 or #fatphobia djflksjdfj or #racism /// (like i do!). make sure if you do this theres a space between the trigger and the letters/numbers/symbols.
if you’d like you can signal boost this so your followers know to watch out

cutemetalhead:

by the way, since we’re talking about r/tumblrinaction, i just thought you should all know that they literally encourage their users to go through these tags to pick on people, so i’d be wary about tagging stuff so it appears in these tags.

as was stated before, a lot of redditors use an entry youre featured on to send you anon hate, reblog your post to unsafe people, etc. so they might find you through these tags. a good way to avoid this is to put letters/numbers/symbols after the trigger, so you could put say #ableism 890283948 or #fatphobia djflksjdfj or #racism /// (like i do!). make sure if you do this theres a space between the trigger and the letters/numbers/symbols.

if you’d like you can signal boost this so your followers know to watch out

(via hobbitkaiju)

Tags: harassment

womanistgrrrlcollective:

YES!!
womanistgrrrlcollective:

ourtimeorg:

Congratulations Disney! Click here if you think the minimum wage should be raised everywhere!

According to an analysis by Wider Opportunities for Women, a non-profit advocacy organization aimed at boosting low-income women and families,  It takes $10.20 per hour to survive in America’s cheapest county.
According to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, if minimum kept up with increased worker productivity, the minimum wage should be $21.72 per hour.
In 2011, Disney’s CEO Robert Iger took home 52.8 million dollars. Which is almost $6,849.32 per hour.
And Disney had a revenue of $45B (x) in 2013, a market cap of $103.96B and employs only 166,000 people. 
If Disney paid all of those 166,000 people 21.72 and hour for 40 hrs a week it will only cost Disney $6, 922,598,400 so almost $7 B, and if you take the $129 million expenses into consideration, they will have $37+ B left over for whatever. Here is what you can buy with just $1 Billion.
So no, I will not be congratulating Disney on anything and neither should anyone.

womanistgrrrlcollective:

ourtimeorg:

Congratulations Disney! Click here if you think the minimum wage should be raised everywhere!

According to an analysis by Wider Opportunities for Women, a non-profit advocacy organization aimed at boosting low-income women and families,  It takes $10.20 per hour to survive in America’s cheapest county.

According to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, if minimum kept up with increased worker productivity, the minimum wage should be $21.72 per hour.

In 2011, Disney’s CEO Robert Iger took home 52.8 million dollars. Which is almost $6,849.32 per hour.

And Disney had a revenue of $45B (x) in 2013, a market cap of $103.96B and employs only 166,000 people.

If Disney paid all of those 166,000 people 21.72 and hour for 40 hrs a week it will only cost Disney $6, 922,598,400 so almost $7 B, and if you take the $129 million expenses into consideration, they will have $37+ B left over for whatever. Here is what you can buy with just $1 Billion.

So no, I will not be congratulating Disney on anything and neither should anyone.

When you have mixed feelings about an abusive relationship

realsocialskills:

Content warning: this post probably uses language that gets used against abuse victims. I’m trying to avoid that, but I don’t think I’ve entirely succeeded, and some of these words might be triggering. Proceed with caution.

So, here’s the thing.

People are complicated, and relationships are even more complicated. Abuse victims are often pressured to pretend that things are simple. They’re pressured to believe that if there was any positive aspect whatsoever to an abusive relationship, then it wasn’t really as abusive as they think it was.

But it doesn’t work that way. People aren’t averaged. People can do some really good things, and some abusive things. They don’t cancel each other out. They coexist. Whatever else happened, the abuse was real, and you’re right not to tolerate it.

Sometimes… sometimes your abuser is also the person who taught you your favorite recipe.

Or something fundamental about how you understand the world.

Or a major skill you now use professionally.

Or maybe they gave you a lot of valuable criticism that made your art better.

Or maybe they supported you materially when you were in real trouble.

Or any number of other things.

And…

…none of that makes the abuse ok. None of that is mitigating in any way. It doesn’t cancel anything out. Sometimes people talk like the abusive interactions and the good ones get put in a blender or something, and like some sort of theoretical blended average is what really counts. That’s not how it works. It’s the actual interactions that count, not some theoretical average. The abuse is real, and significant, no matter what else happened.

It doesn’t have to be one or the other. If some things about an abusive relationship were positive, it’s ok to acknowledge and value them.

And you can still refuse to ever have anything to do with your abuser ever again. You can still be angry. You can still hate them. You can still decide never to forgive them. You can still warn people against them. None of these things are mutually exclusive.

And, most importantly, valuing some aspects of the relationship or having some positive memories does not in *any way* mean the abuse was your fault.

(via hobbitkaiju)

pomme-poire-peche:

Alt-text: “I can’t remember where I heard this, but someone once said that defending a position by citing free speech is sort of the ultimate concession; you’re saying that the most compelling thing you can say for your position is that it’s not literally illegal to express.”

pomme-poire-peche:

Alt-text: “I can’t remember where I heard this, but someone once said that defending a position by citing free speech is sort of the ultimate concession; you’re saying that the most compelling thing you can say for your position is that it’s not literally illegal to express.”

(via hobbitkaiju)

miss-love:

lemonsharks:

amber-and-ice:

aflyingcontradiction:

sword-meets-rose:

feministkitten:


source

i wrote a paper as a senior in high school about this and when tracking the unhealthy relationship symptoms i found this out too. fucking a.


THIS is a legitimate reason to think Twilight is problematic. Not “oooh, but it’s girly literature cause the vampires sparkle and all the teen girls are into Edward”. As funny as some of the sparkly vampires jokes are - and they really sometimes are - Twilight’s very unique take on vampires is the least of the series’ problems, yet this criticism gets heard a lot more than the criticism of people who have noticed that something isn’t quite right in the relationship between Edward and Bella.

I brought this up every chance I had when I was working with the youth theatre girls this summer. There was one in particular who was way gaga over Edward and how she wanted a boyfriend just like him, so I told her “Oh, you’d be ok with a guy who followed you everywhere, invaded your privacy, ignored your feelings, sabotaged your friendships, and isolated you from everyone you’ve ever loved? And nearly killed you on several occasions?”
And I literally watched the switch flip in her head.

ALL OF THESE THINGS.

I HAVE ALWAYS SAID THISSSSSSSS

miss-love:

lemonsharks:

amber-and-ice:

aflyingcontradiction:

sword-meets-rose:

feministkitten:

source

i wrote a paper as a senior in high school about this and when tracking the unhealthy relationship symptoms i found this out too. fucking a.

THIS is a legitimate reason to think Twilight is problematic. Not “oooh, but it’s girly literature cause the vampires sparkle and all the teen girls are into Edward”. As funny as some of the sparkly vampires jokes are - and they really sometimes are - Twilight’s very unique take on vampires is the least of the series’ problems, yet this criticism gets heard a lot more than the criticism of people who have noticed that something isn’t quite right in the relationship between Edward and Bella.

I brought this up every chance I had when I was working with the youth theatre girls this summer. There was one in particular who was way gaga over Edward and how she wanted a boyfriend just like him, so I told her “Oh, you’d be ok with a guy who followed you everywhere, invaded your privacy, ignored your feelings, sabotaged your friendships, and isolated you from everyone you’ve ever loved? And nearly killed you on several occasions?”

And I literally watched the switch flip in her head.

ALL OF THESE THINGS.

I HAVE ALWAYS SAID THISSSSSSSS

(via hicockalorum)

"I am constantly perplexed and annoyed by the persistent bias against female bosses. Even many feminist women will unleash a torrent of misogynist tropes at the mere mention of female colleagues: Women are terrible bosses; female colleagues are the worst; women are back-stabbing, catty, two-faced, incompetent, etc.

This has not been my experience. I have had multiple female bosses, and I have loved working for all of them.

My first job out of college started as a temporary position at a reception desk. When I started, the president (a man) and vice-president (a woman) of the firm were traveling out of the office for a few days. I was told they’d be calling in for messages, and I was warned—repeatedly—that the vice-president, Helene, was a dragon lady, a bitch, a holy terror. The nicest way it was put to me is that she was “difficult.” I was admonished to be very careful about how I gave her messages to her, because she would destroy me if I made a mistake.

I made sure to provide her messages in precisely the way I’d been instructed, and she was perfectly polite to me over the phone. But, by the time she was due back in the office, I’d been warned about her so many times, in so many blunt and nasty ways, that I was, frankly, terrified of her.

Helene returned to the office one morning, an hour late as I would discover was her habit. She was a beautiful, fashionable, confident woman. She introduced herself brusquely, but welcomed me to the team. I was intimidated by the sheer force of her presence, but she seemed nice enough. I waited for the other shoe to drop, for the dragon lady to reveal herself.

That day never came.

Within a couple of months, my position had been made permanent, and I was quickly promoted to an assistant position in Helene’s department. Helene was tough. She had high expectations of me. But she was also an incredibly generous mentor. I was eager to learn, and she was keen to teach me. She wanted things done a certain way, but she was open to suggestions and encouraged me to challenge her. And if I ever came up with a better way to do something, she was grateful for the idea and let me know she was proud of me. She never took credit for my ideas; to the contrary, she championed me.

By the time I left, I was the director of her department, and I had my own office overlooking Lake Michigan. From reception to an executive office in five years. And it was in no small part because of Helene’s eminent willingness to teach, support, and empower me.

The thing is, Helene could indeed be “difficult.” But not with me. She was “difficult” with the male executives who treated her like shit, with the male staff who undermined her authority. She was “difficult” with people who treated her, the only female executive at the firm, fundamentally differently than they treated the men.

Funny that I developed a reputation for being “difficult,” too.

This has been my experience working for and with “difficult” women. I’m sure there are shitty female bosses in the world; of course there are. But lots of what supposedly constitutes a “difficult” female boss, or colleague, is frequently a reflection of dynamics to which she’s reacting.

Dynamics like the one in which people reject female bosses, instead of rejecting workplace misogyny."

Melissa McEwan, Who’s the Boss? (via dee-lirious)

The people who lead the organization’s branch I volunteer for are all women color and it is amazing.I wouldn’t have it any other way.

(via womanistgrrrlcollective)

(via womanistgrrrlcollective)

Tags: misogyny